Browsing: SIDE DISHES

SIDE DISHES

Tomatoes become sweeter when they are oven-roasted – toss these in cooked pasta for an easy supper or pop them into a kilner jar, cover with more oil and leave them in the fridge for up to a week to serve in salads, with poached eggs or to smear on toasted baguette (rub the bread with a cut garlic clove first).

SIDE DISHES

Roasting kale couldn’t be easier. We’ve used olive oil but you could substitute rapeseed oil mixed with toasted sesame oil to give it a nutty flavour. Serve roast kale as a snack with a glass of wine or add it to a salad.

SIDE DISHES

This is how to make Tabbouleh (spelt Taboula in Iraqi cuisine), the middle-eastern parsley and bulgar wheat salad: there should be considerably more parsley than bulgar grains (some people say a 9:1 ratio of parsley to bulgar) in an authentic recipe, though delis and restaurants reverse the ratio and you end up with a version that is out of kilter with the original.

SIDE DISHES

When you live in a country like Ireland where pearl barley often appears only in the national dish of Irish stew, you forget what a versatile grain it can be. It’s easy to cook, the Chinese think it’s good for the kidneys and it has a toothsome texture that appeals to all ages.

SIDE DISHES

A potato gratin made with Comté, a French cheese made with raw milk. It’s similar to Gruyère – it’s a hard cheese and they look similar – but Comté is milder and has a nutty flavour. It melts well so it’s perfect for a gratin.

SIDE DISHES Buttered Leek Irish recipe

An Irish recipe favourite, you can serve buttered leeks with roast beef or lamb. Buy firm leeks that don’t flop and are not wrinkled.

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