Browsing: MAIN COURSES

MAIN COURSES Roast Salmon Fillets with Ras al Hanout

Roast Salmon Fillets with Ras el Hanout

Ras el hanout is a North African spice blend: it varies depending on who makes it (everyone has their favourite recipe) and where you find it. It can have anything from cumin, clove, cardamon, nutmeg and black pepper to paprika and even dried rose petals in it – what is consistent is that the spices are toasted then ground, usually by hand. You can buy it in specialist food shops and online. + A recipe for Ras El Hanout and How to cook Salmon En Papillote!

MAIN COURSES

Tomato and Bean Salsa Wraps (Vegan friendly)

You won’t miss meat when you eat these tomato and bean salsa wraps. Feel free to use mixed beans, or butter beans or kidney beans. Heat the finished salsa with a tablespoon of olive oil in a saucepan to make a warm salsa wrap.

MAIN COURSES Fig, Proscuitto and Walnut Salad (Vegan-friendly) recipe

Fig, Proscuitto and Walnut Salad (Vegan-friendly)

An infinitely versatile salad recipe which can be served as an appetiser, as lunch or as a main course. Use ripe melon instead of figs if they are out of season and toasted almonds instead of walnuts. Instead of rocket use frisée or lamb’s lettuc. Choose any cured meat from San Danielle ham to Parma ham to bresaola. Omit the meat and use a gluten-free mustard to make a vegan-version

COOKBOOK RECIPES

Japan – The Cookbook: Ramen

‘In Japan, there are ramen shops in every town’, says Nancy Singleton Hachisu in her introduction to this ramen recipe from ‘Japan’, the new book from Phaidon. ‘Here is a home-style ramen recipe for those who want to try making their own at home.’ Her book contains over 400 simple elegant authentic recipes including soups, noodles, rices, pickles, one-pots, sweets, and vegetables. Below she explains how to make your own ramen noodles at home using a good quality plain flour that you can buy at your local supermarket – the technique is similar to making pasta.

COOKBOOK RECIPES Diana Henry recipe for Broad Beans with Lettuce, Shallots and Mint

Broad Beans with Lettuce, Shallots and Mint

From Telegraph food writer and James Beard award-winning cookbook author Diana Henry’s new cookbook How to Eat a Peach celebrating menus, stories and places. She cooks up feasts for family and friends based on meals she has cooked and loved over the years.  She serves this with Leg of Lamb Stuffed with Lemon and Many Herbs from the same book.

COOKBOOK RECIPES Diana Henry recipe for leg of lamb stuffed with lemon & many herbs

Leg of Lamb Stuffed with Lemon and Many Herbs

Telegraph food writer and James Beard award-winning cookbook author Diana Henry has published her new cookbook How to Eat a Peach celebrating menus, stories and places. She cooks up feasts for family and friends based on meals she has cooked and loved over the years. ‘This lamb came about because I couldn’t decide which herb to choose, so I just used several together, and I’ve now been making it for thirty years’, writes Diana. ‘The herb paste permeates every bit of the meat. Because it’s simple, I usually serve it with an unusual – but not complicated – side dish. The sarassou recipe (see link at the end of this recipe) is excellent with the lamb, radishes and potatoes.’

COOKBOOK RECIPES Diana Henry Recipe: Spinach and Ricotta Gnudi from her How to Eat a Peach cookbook

Diana Henry Recipe: Spinach and Ricotta Gnudi

Telegraph food writer and James Beard award-winning cookbook author Diana Henry has published her new cookbook How to Eat a Peach celebrating menus, stories and places. ‘Tender little dumplings, as fragile as a pasta filling, which is how they got their name: gnudi is Tuscan dialect for ‘naked’ (and Michelangelo’s paintings of nude figures in the Sistine Chapel were referred to as ignudi)’, says Diana. ‘I adore these. They take a bit of time to make, but I love the process; you need a light touch, as forming them is like handling flowers. I am sometimes tempted to complicate gnudi – adding strips of Parma ham, lightly cooked broad beans or peas (and all of these are fine additions) – but they’re best unadorned, served with nothing more than melted butter.’

MAIN COURSES Roast Sweet Potato Chorizo Orange.jpg

Roast Sweet Potato, Spicy Chorizo and Orange Salad

This is the kind of salad that we eat when we want to be healthy but not puritan. You can eat a bowl on its own or serve it as a side dish with a piece of grilled fish (we take a few fillets of fresh plaice, dip them in seasoned flour and fry on both sides in butter or olive oil). To make an easy middle-eastern version sprinkle the sweet potato with cumin or coriander seeds before you add the olive oil. Then cook any grain – couscous, fregola or even pearl barley are good – and toss with the warm sweet potato and chorizo salad when it comes out of the oven.

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