Teurgoule

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Sinead Allart from the Wilde Kitchen in Cookery School in France kindly gave us this recipe. She says ‘the word teurgoule comes from Norman patois – tordre la bouche – to contort or twist the mouth, and was served piping hot on cold winter days. Traditionally baked in a bread oven (boulangerie) as it cooled down after a bread-making session, the story goes that people used to bring their teurgoule, ready for baking, to the local boulanger who would carry out the long baking process.

Serves 4-6

Ingredients

1.5 litres full-fat milk
120g pearl rice
150g sugar
2 teaspoon cinnamon

Instructions

1. Place all the ingredients in a (buttered) terrine-style dish/pie dish.

2. Mix well and place in a cool oven (about 120°C) for about 3 hours.

3. You may need to cover (with foil) at some stage if the top becomes very brown.

Recipe note
Tergoule is delicious hot or cold.

You’ll find Sinead Allart’s cookery school at the Wilde Kitchen

 

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